Beer

Is there trouble brewing at your office in the form of patients not accepting their treatment? This may be the reason.

One hundred years ago, Schlitz Beer (remember Schlitz??) became the number one selling beer in the country by running a radical marketing campaign. Their ad detailed how Schlitz beer was actually made. Since no one reading the ad previously knew how beer was made, they assumed this was some kind of proprietary process – and Schlitz’s sales quickly rose to the top! It became known as “The beer that made Milwaukee famous!” (Or was it “the beer that made Mel Famey walk us?”)

Fast forward to 2017. Do beer ads describe the brewing process in detail? No way. They show attractive twenty-somethings at the beach. They show beautiful crispy-clear snow-covered mountains. They show majestic horses. The goal is to get a feeling attached to their brand, so when you pick up a six-pack of Budweiser you are transported from your dull, ordinary life to a place you would rather be. We all know it isn’t true, but with annual US beer sales topping $100 billion, it seems to be working!

So what’s the point? Your patient doesn’t want to hear about how the crown is made, how the implant surgery is done, and what their composite resin is made of. They want to know how it will look, how it will function, and how it will make them feel!

Get excited about how your dentistry will transform your patient! And if you can get them equally excited, go pop open a beer!

Say this, not that…

SAY THIS

“We would love to see you as a patient in our practice! Would tomorrow at 3:00 PM or Tuesday at 11:00 AM be better for you?”

NOT THAT

“Would you like to make an appointment?”

SAY THIS

“I know what the problem is and I can help you.”

NOT THAT

“This tooth needs a crown.”

SAY THIS

“Would you mind if I place you on a brief hold? I’ll be right back and able to give you my full attention.”

NOT THAT

“Dental office – hold please….”

SAY THIS

“We have some fantastic financial options to help make the cost of treatment more comfortable.”

NOT THAT

“Sorry – it’s not covered by insurance.”

SAY THIS

“Hello Mrs. Costello, I’m Dr. Luther. What may I help you with today?

NOT THAT

“Open wide please…..”

SAY THIS

“Thank you for calling Hill Valley Family Dentistry, this is Lorraine – I can help you!”

NOT THAT

(Voice mail answers) “If you’re hearing this message during normal practice hours, we are busy treating other patients…”

SAY THIS

“When you return for your next cleaning and examination in three months, we want to pay close attention to that area on the lower right to make sure the inflammation is under control.”

NOT THAT

“You’re due for a check-up in six months.”

SAY THIS

“If you were a member of my own family, that is the treatment I would recommend.”

NOT THAT

“If you can’t afford a crown we can always do a large filling.”

SAY THIS

“Yes!”

NOT THAT

“No…..”

This word is now officially banned from your office

The Adventures Of Huckleberry Finn by Mark Twain.
James and The Giant Peach by Roald Dahl.
The Diary of a Young Girl by Anne Frank.
To Kill A Mockingbird by Harper Lee.
The Color Purple by Alice Walker.

What do these books, and hundreds of others have in common?

True, they are all classics. And yes, you may have been forced to read them.

But believe it or not, all of these great novels have been banned at one time or another.

As you may know, we are not big fans of censorship, or even strict rules and policies – especially when it comes to your dental practice.

However, there is one word that we would like you to ban completely from your office, both in the written and verbal form. That word?

Cancellation.

A short time ago we were observing in someone’s office and heard this phrase:

“We don’t have anything for you next week, but don’t worry – we ALWAYS get cancellations!”

Yikes! Why would anyone even insinuate to a patient that a cancellation is okay?

When you make confirmation calls, do you give the option to cancel? We hope not. As a matter of fact, why even use the word “confirmation?” That still gives the patient a little bit of an out.

Here’s our suggested verbiage for what was formerly known as the confirmation call:

“Hello, Mrs. Jones? This is Emily from Dr. Sumner’s office. We’re looking forward to seeing you this Friday at 11:00 AM.”

That’s it. Nothing about if you need to change it, if you have any questions, etc.. Short, simple, sweet and positive is the way to go.

And that goes for signs in the reception area and text on your website and cards that say something like:

“If you need to cancel, kindly give 48 hours notice.”

What does that mean? It means that if you cancel 48 hours and one minute before your appointment, that is fine. But it’s not fine!! Do you really want to give a patient permission to do that?

So try it. It works! Get the word “cancellation” the heck out of your vocabulary!!