His Fly Was Down

Recently our friend Sally got to meet a Nobel Prize nominated physicist.

She said that he was incredibly intelligent, articulate, funny, charming, and if that’s not enough, really good looking! But what was the main takeaway – the think she mentioned first and couldn’t stop talking about?

His fly was down.

There is a thing called “Negativity Bias” – a psychological phenomenon by which we have greater recall of unpleasant things than positive ones. It was first proposed and published by psychologists Paul Rozin and Edward Royzman in 2001 and has been confirmed by many follow-up studies. It’s why, for example, five minutes of turbulence and a screaming baby are what someone would remember from a five hour flight that arrived on time and landed safely.

It’s also why a cranky, unhappy patient is more likely to write a review online. And it’s why we have to do so many little things right, or the patient will remember mostly the bad.

Run late, cause pain, estimate insurance incorrectly, etc…. and there is a great chance negativity bias will undermine your otherwise excellent treatment.

What are you doing in your practice to cause negativity bias, and how can you correct it?